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Gustavo Thomas recently had a great post on Chinese shadow puppet theatre. His site has a video showing behind-the-scenes how the shadow puppets are operated (at the end of long, skinny sticks). Here’s a view from the audience of the show Thomas vlogged featuring the Monkey King, a character who can change form (6 1/2 minutes, Wuzhen Dongzha, China).

Next is a clip from a documentary film A Life in Shadows.

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This is L’Animateur, a stop-motion puppetty short by Nick Hilligoss. It’s amusing.

And, very low budget, judging from this article. Turned out pretty awesome.

Here is a really amazing performance by the French puppeteers Compagnie Philippe Genty. It’s cool how Genty turns a scarf into a goofy little creature. Quite funny.

And next is an overview of some more of their work. Not sure what language the ad is in…

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Here is a stop-animation puppet short called From Behind, by The Village of Marchen in Tokyo, Japan. I love this kind of stuff, so I’m posting it even though it’s not exactly puppeteering I guess. I think I decided already with Trnka’s The Hand that stop-animation puppets count as “videos of puppets.” 🙂 I originally found this short thru a post at Chawed Rosin. It’s good.

That was part one of a collection called Worku. They also posted a trailer for part two:

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Bunraku is a Japanese performance art using puppets with really life-like, nuanced movements. Here’s a sample. The puppeteers are out in the open; you just ignore them and watch the puppet.

This next set of videos are from a great documentary on Bunraku. I wish I knew what the documentary was called so I could cite it. [UPDATE: The YouTube poster, heikoushi, says it is a TV show called Weekend Japanology.] Anyway, you don’t need any more details on this stuff from me; the video goes into great depth:

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Here is Jiri Trnka‘s animated puppet film The Hand. My brother forwarded me this video through a really great post at Seksuvision:

Ruka (aka The Hand) (1965) is [Trnka’s] last film he made before his death in 1969 and reflects Trnka’s own struggle to create art under a totalitarian regime. Sadly, it was banned by the regime he worked under after his death. However, it is currently available for purchase in the U.S. as part of this DVD compilation.”

Here is the video: